FAQs

/FAQs
Where can You get help?

Download and Print a copy of Frequently Asked Questions for Health Students


Yes. Live viral vaccines inhibit the response to tuberculin. As such, tuberculin skin testing may be unreliable for at least 4 weeks after the administration of live viral vaccines. Either have your TST and the TST reading attended before having measles, mumps, rubella, varicella or yellow fever vaccination or plan to have any course of live vaccines completed at least 4 weeks before any tuberculin skin testing (TST).

Yes. As advised by the NHMRC “The standard 3-dose schedule induces protective levels of neutralising antibody against hepatitis B virus in more than 90% of adults. The frequency of seroconversion increases progressively from approximately 35% after the 1st dose to more than 90% after the 3rd dose. There is evidence of immunity in most vaccine recipients after administration of 2 doses of a 3-dose schedule. However, the 3rd dose is necessary to increase the percentage of responders and to provide long-term protection.”

As a health care worker it is important to have long term protection.

If your blood test does not state “immune” for all three diseases (low positive, borderline or equivocal is not considered immune), you will require evidence of 2 vaccinations. Be aware that if you need 2 doses, these must be given at least 28 days apart. (See Table D.)

 Serological confirmation of immunity for measles, mumps and rubella after vaccination is not required. If serology has been undertaken and indicates “negative / equivocal or borderline / low positive/low level immunity” see Table D – Advice re MMR and varicella serology interpretation.

 Note this advice differs for women planning pregnancy where vaccinated women should be tested for rubella seroconversion 6 to 8 weeks after vaccination

Your immunisation compliance must be completed within six months of commencement of the course and well in advance of any clinical placement. For most disciplines you must complete this in semester one.

For those disciplines that attend clinical placement in the first semester of study (such as medicine and midwifery) you will need to plan ahead to get this done well before clinical placement.

Criminal Record Checks (CRC) can take some time to obtain so it is recommended you apply for this before commencing your course.

 NSW Health will arrange to sight your CRC early in your first semester / trimester so it is essential you obtain this early.

For University of Newcastle, special provision has been provided for Social Work and Nutrition and Dietetics students to provide their Criminal Record Check at the beginning of their second year of study (as they do not attend clinical placement in year one). This may also apply to other course who don’t undertake clinical placement in first year (by negotiation with the NSW Health agency responsible to validate your information in ClinConnect).

If you are issued with a conditional letter following a risk assessment, you must disclose the conditions to the University Clinical Placement Coordinator / Facilitator, who must then inform the NSW Public Health Facility before any Clinical Placement can be confirmed. The NSW Public Health Facility must determine whether they can manage the student in accordance with the conditions.

 You are not required to disclose the details of your criminal history to your clinical placement officer.

If your National Police Certificate (or overseas Police Certificates /Statutory Declaration for overseas students) shows any convictions or pending charges,you will be required to apply to the NSW Department of Health, Corporate Governance and Risk Management, External Relations and Employment Screening Unit (ERESU) for authority to undertake clinical placements within NSW Public Health Facilities.

Students must provide the Department of Health with copies of any Police Certificates (i.e. in Australia or overseas), Statutory Declarations, if completed and other relevant documents including the ‘Student Risk Assessment Form’ available on the NSW Health Department website.

(http://www.health.nsw.gov.au/resources/jobs/student_clearance/pdf/Appendix_3_S7.pdf)

Applications should be sent to the NSW Department of Health, Corporate Governance and Risk Management Branch, External Relations and Employment Screening Unit (ERESU), LMB 961, NORTH SYDNEY NSW 2059. ERESU will complete a risk assessment and if you are deemed suitable for placements within NSW Public Health Facilities, you will be issued with a `Clinical Placement Authority’ card or a Conditional Letter.

Provide this document to the NSW Health agency responsible for validating your information in ClinConnect as per Criminal Reord Check requirements.

When a conditional letter is issued to a student following a risk assessment, the student must disclose the conditions to the University Clinical Placement Coordinator / Facilitator, who must then inform the NSW Public Health Facility before any Clinical Placement can be confirmed. The NSW Public Health Facility must determine whether they can manage the student in accordance with the conditions.

The NSW Public Health Facility may refuse a clinical placement if they are unable to manage the student in accordance with the conditions.

At the start of each placement, students with criminal records must present to the NSW Public Health Facility a valid Clinical Placement Authority card or a conditional letter issued by the Department of Health. Students should not provide the NSW Health Facility with Police Certificates or Statutory Declarations that show criminal records.

If the student is deemed an unacceptable risk to NSW Health, or has not provided the required documentation, ERESU may decline their application for authority to undertake clinical placements. They will be informed of this decision in writing and will be required to inform their educational institution’s Clinical Placement Coordinator or Facilitator.

If you need a National Police Certificate you must undergo a National Criminal Record Check either through your state or territory police service or through the Australian Federal Police in order to obtain a National Police Certificate.

Do not obtain a national police certificate from a private broker agency. Ensure it is from The Australian Federal Police or state police such as NSW Police.

You must ensure that the name provided to obtain your National Police Certificate matches the name on your Student ID card. If the name on your National Police Certificate does not match the name on your Student ID card, you will not be allowed to commence your clinical placement within a NSW Public Health Facility.

You should allow at least 15 working days for the police to provide you with a National Police Certificate. If you have been previously charged or convicted of offences, the process of obtaining your clearance to undertake clinical placements will take longer and you should allow at least 30 working days.

You will not be allowed to commence a clinical placement within a NSW Public Health Facility unless you have a National Police Certificate that shows no criminal offences or you have a clearance document from the NSW Department of Health. 

add link re FAQ What if my National Police Check identifies a criminal history?

Interstate Students – refer to your state or territory police service website for information on how to request a National Criminal Record Check, if not applying through the NSW Police or apply via Australian Federal Police.

Criminal Record Checks issued by other agencies such as private broker agencies can not be accepted.

NSW Police (http://www.police.nsw.gov.au/)

  • applications normally take 10-14 working days to complete but can take up to 20 days
  • applications must be completed online
  • there is a fee of approximately $52 which must be paid by the student directly to the Police Service
  • application information can be found at:

http://www.police.nsw.gov.au/about_us/structure/specialist_operations/forensic_services/criminal_records_section

 Australian Federal Police (http://www.afp.gov.au/)

  • applications can take up to 25 days to process
  • applications can be completed online or printed and posted
  • there is a fee of approximately $42 which must be paid by the student directly to the Police Service
  • application information can be found at:

http://www.afp.gov.au/what-wedo/police-checks/national-police-checks.aspx#forms

Students are required to provide their documentation of:

1. Student photo identification issued by the education provider  – in the same name as the criminal record check

2. Signed  NSW Health Code of Conduct Agreement add link to code of coduct document and the required form 

3. A Criminal Record Check – as per part A or B from the table below.


Provide documents for either Part A or Part B 

Criminal Record Check
A National Police Certificate with no convictions / charges (issued by Australian State / Territory Police) expires 3 years from issue date
Overseas students only: Along with the Australian National Police Certificate, an original of one of the following has also been sighted and a copy is provided for the records:
Police Certificate with no convictions / charges from their home country or any country that they have resided in
OR
Signed Statutory Declaration with no convictions / charges
OR
B Clinical Placement Authority card issued by NSW Health pre 1 June 2010 (no expiry date) but which is valid for the duration of the course
OR
Clinical Placement Authority card issued by NSW Health post 1 June 2010 (with expiry date)
OR
Conditional letter issued by NSW Health (with expiry date)

 

Information from NHMRC Australian Immunisation Handbook 2013 information regarding pregnancy, lactation and vaccination:

 3.3.2 Vaccination of women planning pregnancy, pregnant or breastfeeding women, and preterm infants:

 (i)  Women planning pregnancy

The need for vaccination, particularly for hepatitis B, measles, mumps, rubella, varicella, diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis, should be assessed as part of any pre-conception health check. Where previous vaccination history or infection is uncertain, relevant serological testing can be undertaken to ascertain immunity to hepatitis B, measles, mumps and rubella. Routine serological testing for pertussis and varicella does not provide a reliable measure of vaccine-induced immunity, although varicella serology can indicate whether previous natural infection has occurred Influenza vaccine is recommended for any person who wishes to be protected against influenza and is recommended for women planning pregnancy. Those with risk factors for pneumococcal disease, including smokers and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, should be assessed for pneumococcal vaccination. Women who receive live attenuated viral vaccines should be advised against falling pregnant within 28 days of vaccination.

It is also important that women of child-bearing age who present for immunisation should be questioned regarding the possibility of pregnancy as part of the routine pre-vaccination screening, to avoid inadvertent administration of a vaccine(s) not recommended in pregnancy.

 (ii) Pregnancy

Table 3.3.1 summarises the recommendations for vaccine use in pregnancy. More detailed information is also provided under the ‘Pregnancy and breastfeeding’ sections of each disease-specific chapter in Part 4 of the Handbook.

Table 3.3.1: Recommendations for vaccination in pregnancy

Vaccines routinely recommended in pregnancy
Inactivated viral vaccines Recommendation Comments  
Influenza vaccine Recommended for all pregnant women at any stage of pregnancy, particularly those who will be in the second or third trimester during the influenza season. There is evidence from clinical trial data and observational studies that there is no increased risk of congenital defects or adverse effects in the fetuses of women who are vaccinated against influenza in pregnancy. Influenza immunisation protects the mother, as pregnancy increases her risk of severe influenza, and also protects her newborn baby in the first few months after birth (see 4.7 Influenza).
Vaccines not routinely recommended in pregnancy
Inactivated bacterial vaccines Recommendation Comments
Diphtheria-, tetanus-, and pertussis-containing vaccines (dTpa, dT) dTpa can be given to pregnant women in the third trimester as an alternative to post-partum dTpa (if a dose of dTpa has not been given in the previous 5 years). Vaccination in the third trimester is an acceptable alternative to post-partum vaccination, for pregnant women who have not been given a dTpa dose within the previous 5 years. Receipt of dTpa in the third trimester of pregnancy may be preferred when the risk of the mother and/or infant acquiring pertussis is high, such as for pregnant women in close contact with infants. Vaccination during pregnancy has the advantage of achieving more timely and high pertussis antibody responses in the mother and infant after birth, as compared with vaccination given post-partum or prior to conception.Tetanus and diphtheria containing vaccines have been used extensively in pregnant women, with no increased risk of congenital abnormalities in fetuses of women who were vaccinated during pregnancy.

(See 4.12 Pertussis for more details.)

Inactivated viral vaccines Recommendation Comments
Hepatitis B vaccine Not routinely recommended.Can be given to susceptible pregnant women for whom this vaccine would otherwise be recommended, for example, as post-exposure prophylaxis in a non-immune pregnant women with a significant exposure to a HBsAg-positive source. Limited data is available.Hepatitis B vaccine should only be given to pregnant women who are non-immune and at increased risk for hepatitis B.
Live attenuated viral vaccines Recommendation  Comments
Measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine or Measles-mumps-rubella-varicella (MMRV) vaccine Contraindicated There is only a hypothetical risk. Despite concerns that live attenuated rubella vaccine virus might cause congenital abnormalities, rubella vaccine (either monovalent or as MMR) has been given to pregnant women (usually inadvertently) without harm to the fetus. Even though rubella vaccine virus can infect the fetus, even for vaccine given in early pregnancy, there is no evidence that it causes congenital rubella syndrome in infants born to susceptible mothers. Receipt of rubella vaccination during pregnancy is not an indication for termination.Women of child-bearing age should avoid pregnancy for 28 days after vaccination.

It is recommended practice to test all pregnant women for immunity to rubella, and to vaccinate susceptible women as soon as possible after delivery and check their serological status post vaccination.

Immunoglobulins for use as pre- or post-exposure prophylaxis 
Pooled or hyperimmune immunoglobulins Not routinely recommended. Can be used post exposure in susceptible pregnant women exposed to: measles, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, rabies, Australian bat lyssavirus, or varicella viruses, or tetanus. Limited data is available. There is no known risk to the fetus from passive immunisation of pregnant women with immunoglobulins.

For more details, see Part 5 Passive immunisation and relevant disease-specific chapters in Part 4.

Tuberculosis screening / vaccination
TST / Mantoux test Not contraindicated.There is no evidence that TST poses any risk in pregnancy and / or when breastfeeding an infant or that tuberculin reaction is influenced by pregnancy.
BCG vaccination Contraindicated in pregnancy.Rarely offered / recommended for adults in Australia.

 Seasonal influenza vaccine is the only vaccine routinely recommended for pregnant women. dTpa vaccine can also be given in pregnancy, as an alternative to providing it immediately post-partum. Vaccination with dTpa during pregnancy will provide timely protection against pertussis in both the mother and her newborn child.

Many other inactivated vaccines are not routinely recommended during pregnancy on precautionary grounds; however, there is no convincing evidence that pregnancy should be an absolute contraindication to vaccination with these vaccines. There is some evidence that fever per se is teratogenic; however, in clinical studies most inactivated vaccines are not associated with increased rates of fever in adults (as compared with placebo).

Recommendations regarding vaccine use in pregnancy are made where the benefits of protection from vaccination outweigh the risks. Eliminating the risk of exposure to vaccine-preventable diseases during pregnancy (e.g. by changing travel plans, avoiding high-risk behaviours or occupational exposures) is both an alternative and complementary strategy to vaccination. 

 Live attenuated viral vaccines are contraindicated in pregnant women because of the hypothetical risk of harm should vaccine virus replication occur in the fetus. If a live attenuated viral vaccine is inadvertently given to a pregnant woman, or if a woman becomes pregnant within 28 days of vaccination, she should be counselled about the potential for adverse effects, albeit extremely unlikely, to the fetus. There is, however, no indication to consider termination of a pregnancy if a live attenuated vaccine has been inadvertently given.

 (iii) Breastfeeding and vaccination

 Vaccination is rarely contraindicated in breastfeeding women. The rubella vaccine virus may be secreted in human breast milk and there has been documented transmission to breastfed infants. However, where infection has occurred in an infant, the symptoms have been absent or mild.  Infants born to mothers who are hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive can also be breastfed, provided the infant is appropriately immunised at birth. Although studies have indicated the presence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in the breast milk of mothers with HBV infection, breastfeeding poses no additional risk of virus transmission, compared with formula feeding, in vaccinated infants.
 
Administration of yellow fever vaccine to breastfeeding women should be avoided, except in situations where the risk of acquiring yellow fever is high, and/or travel cannot be avoided or postponed. While extremely rare, there have been several case reports of probable transmission of the yellow fever vaccine virus via breast milk.  For most vaccines, the immune response to vaccination of infants in relationship to breastfeeding has been studied and taken into account. In general, breastfeeding does not adversely affect immunisation, and breastfeeding is not a contraindication to the administration of any vaccines recommended in infants.

 

You will need to consider the risk to you / your child in the work environment. If you are not fully protected / screened / vaccinated you, your course coordinator and the manager where clinical placement is planned will need to do a risk assessment to determine if placement is reasonable and what precautions may be needed.

It is NOT a requirement of most undergraduate training to be involved with exposure prone procedures.  Check with your course coordinator. However, if you are infectious it may limit the type of practice you may undertake on graduation.

Midwifery and oral health students will undertake EPP and are required to be tested annually and to be aware of their hepatitis B, hepatitis C and HIV status. They have a responsibility not to undertake EPP if infected.  Please discuss this with your course coordinator if you have any concerns.

Exposure prone procedures (EPPs) are those procedures where there is potential for contact between the skin (usually finger or thumb) of the health care worker (HCW) and sharp surgical instruments, needles or sharp tissues (splinters / pieces of bone / tooth) in body cavities or in poorly visualised or confined body sites including the mouth.

Examples include teeth extraction, a majority of dental practices, some orthopaedic surgery, some general and specialist surgery, some midwifery practices.

HCWs who perform EPPs must know their human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) status. NSW Health policy requires HCWs who perform, or who could reasonably be anticipated to perform, EPPs to know their infectious status. 

Infectious HCWs (i.e. those who are either HCV PCR positive or HBV DNA positive or HBeAg positive or HIV positive) must not perform EPPs. HCWs who perform EPPs must be aware of their HIV, HBV and HCV status by seeking serologic testing.

Influenza vaccination is not mandatory but it is highly recommended. Influenza virus infection causes a wide spectrum of disease from minimal or no symptoms, to respiratory illness with multisystem complications and death. Health care workers (HCWs) are frequently implicated as the source of influenza transmission in health care settings. You may be undertaking clinical placement in high risk situations for transmission of the flu.  It is your responsibility to reduce the burden of influenza and its complications among vulnerable patients in hospitals.

Even young, healthy people can get and transmit the flu and it can be a very debilitating disease.

Once you are registered and verified as meeting compliance requirements in the ClinConnect database you should only be required to present your student ID card when attending clinical placement.

Yes, provided:

  • You have no symptoms of active TB disease
  • You undertake the TB screening in a reasonable timeframe as advised by NSW Health.
  • As long as you have fulfilled all the other immunisation requirements.

Not without advice from TB Services. These blood tests are expensive and are usually not required.

 

No. You must complete the TB Assessment Tool.  Your information will be reviewed and you will be referred for TB screening if required. Do not refer yourself to TB Services.

 If you have any symptoms of TB you should see your doctor as soon as possible and do not attend any clinical placement until cleared

This will depend on the results of your TB Assessment Tool. You will be advised and if required a referral to TB services will be made.

 

Yes.  Include information re any previous Mantoux / TST on the TB Assessment Tool.

If you are uncertain that you had varicella infection you should have a blood test. If the blood test result is negative, you should be vaccinated. However, vaccination can proceed without testing (provided there are no contraindications), as the vaccine is well tolerated in seropositive people.

 Post vaccination blood testing is not recommended or necessary.

 Serology testing is useful to confirm a history of varicella infection (chickenpox) however testing is not sensitive enough to detect antibodies following vaccination. If blood test results taken prior to immunisation indicate “negative / equivocal or borderline / low positive / low level immunity” immunity from varicella immunisation cannot be confirmed therefore NSW Health requires evidence of the required number of vaccinations.

If you have also had chickenpox and you / your parents / carer are positve you had chickenpox this will suffice. If you don’t know if you had chickenpox but do know you have had shingles, this will have to have been diagnosed by a doctor and a written record of this provided eg. a letter from your doctor.

If you / your parents / carer are positve you had chickenpox this will suffice. This can be noted on your vaccination card, or in a letter/email.

Evidence of at least 1 dose is sufficient if the person was vaccinated before 14 years of age.  Although a 2nd dose is recommended to ensure optimal immune response. This will minimise the risk of breakthrough infection. 2 doses are required if vaccinated at >14 years of age.

If you have evidence of 2 doses of MMR vaccine this will suffice. If you don’t have this evidence you can either have a blood test to check if you are immune or obtain additional vaccinations so that you do have evidence of 2 vaccinations.

Yes. After a person has been exposed to HBV, appropriate prophylaxis, given as soon as possible but preferably within 24 hours, can effectively prevent infection. The mainstay of post exposure immunoprophylaxis is hepatitis B vaccine, but in certain circumstances the addition of hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG) will provide increased protection.

Refer to: http://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/HBV/HBVfaq.htm

Yes. No differences in immune response are observed when vaccines from different manufacturers are used to complete the vaccine series.

No, the series does not need to be restarted.

  • If the vaccine series was interrupted after the first dose, the second dose should be administered as soon as possible (at least 4 weeks after the first dose).
  • The second and third doses should be separated by an interval of at least 8 weeks.
  • If only the third dose is delayed, it should be administered as soon as possible (after an interval of at least 8 weeks after the 2nd dose and a minimum of 16 weeks after the 1st dose). 

Where there is a history of vaccination but no documentation and the hepatitis B surface antibody blood test has a result of ≥ 10 and it is reasonable to accept that you have been vaccinated as per the appropriate schedule, this may be accepted as compliance.

If it has been confirmed that you are a hepatitis B vaccine non-responder (i.e. you are not positive for hepatitis B surface antigen, you have had the correct courses and boosters as per NHMRC recommendations, and you still don’t have a positive blood test result for hepatitis B surface antibodies) you will need to be aware of the risk to you and actions to take if you have an occupational exposure to blood / body substances that places you at risk of hepatitis B.

Attend to first aid as per first aid instructions. Obtain professional advice e.g. Emergency Department or Staff Health Service whilst on placement.  Your exposure event will be assessed to determine if you are at risk of exposure to the hepatitis B virus and if you require hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG).  If required, this needs to be administered within 72 hours of exposure (preferably within 48 hours).

A hepatitis B non-responder is a person without HBV infection who has a documented history of an age-appropriate primary course of hepatitis B vaccine, but who has never demonstrated an  anti-HBs level > or = 10mI/ml.

Yes.  NSW Health allows time for you to complete this course according to the correct schedule. You must have had at least the first vaccine, and sign Form 3: Student Undertaking / Declaration to say you will complete the vaccination course and are aware of the risk to yourself and action to take if you have an occupational  exposure to blood / body substances that places you at risk of hepatitis B

It will need to be ascertained that you have had the correct course of hepatitis B vaccine and the correct schedule. If not, additional vaccination may be required in order for you to be considered fully vaccinated.

Refer to the hepatitis B immunisation flow chart for specific information.

add hep B flow chart

To test if you are immune after completing your hepatitis B vaccination course you should have a Hepatitis B surface antibody (anti-HBs) (also known as HBsAb) blood test.

To check if you have an acute or chronic hepatitis B infection you should have a Hepatitis B surface antigen blood test (HBsAg) and anti-HBs antibodies.

Guide to hepatitis B blood tests:

 Hepatitis B surface antibody (anti-HBs)Antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen is a marker of immunity. Its presence indicates an immune response to Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) infection, an immune response to vaccination, or the presence of passively acquired antibody. (It is also known as HBsAb).

 Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)Hepatitis B surface antigen is a marker of infectivity. Its presence indicates either acute or chronic HBV infection.

 Antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc) (total) – Antibody to hepatitis B core antigen is a nonspecific marker of acute, chronic, or resolved HBV infection. It is not a marker of vaccine-induced immunity. It may be used in prevaccination testing to determine previous exposure to HBV infection. (It is also known as HBcAb).

Yes.  Post-vaccination serological testing 4 to 8 weeks after completion of the primary course is required. If you need booster doses because you are not immune, you will need to have repeat serology after booster vaccinations to assess if you are then immune.

 No. NSW Health allows time for you to complete the standard course.  You should not undertake the accelerated course as it will delay your final immune testing.

Documented evidence of a completed, age appropriate course of hepatitis B vaccination is:

  • If vaccinated as an adult  ≥ 20 yrs old – a total of 3 doses of 1mL adult formula at 0, 1 and 3 – 6 months
    • The minimum interval between the 2nd and 3rd dose is 2 months
    • The minimal interval between the 1st and 3rd dose is 4 months (16 weeks)
  • If vaccinated as a child / adolescent < 20 yrs old – a total of 3 doses of 0.5 mL paediatric formula at 0, 1 & 3 – 6 months.
    • The minimum interval between the 2nd and 3rd dose is 2 months
    • The minimal interval between the 1st and 3rd dose is 4 months (16 weeks)
  • If vaccinated at 11-15 yrs old – A total of 2 doses of 1mL adult formula at 0 and 4 – 6 months is accepted.

If your hepatits B schedule differs to the suggested age appropriate course of hepatitis B refer to the hepatitis B schedule flow chart

add hepatitis B schedule flow chart

No. One adult dose of diphtheria/ tetanus/ pertussis vaccine (dTpa) is required.  The vaccine is known as Boostrix or Adacel.  A blood test will not be accepted.

No. An adult dose of diphtheria/ tetanus/ pertussis vaccine (dTpa) is required.

No. You will have to see your heath care provider to have this done.

No. We are required to see the evidence of each vaccination / blood test.

Each situation will be considered based on the circumstances.  Evidence of medical conditions such as a statement from your medical practitioner will be required.  Conditional Compliance can be provided. 

 Health Care Students unable to obtain compliance due to contraindications to immunisation (e.g. a medical condition, adverse reaction to immunisation) are asked to contact their educational institution supervisor to initiate risk assessment and a risk management plan in consultation with the health service facility / Staff Health Nurse where clinical placement is planned. Being restricted from working in some clinical areas may be required for your own or patients protection.

You will not be allowed to have clinical placement in NSW Health facilities.
You need to be aware that this may have serious implications relating to your ability to undertake clinical placement, and subsequently to complete your course and will limit the type of practice you could undertake post graduation.

 

If you have concerns regarding vaccination please speak to your health care provider and refer to the publication “Vaccination Myths and Concerns”

add link to document

If vaccines were documented correctly in your Blue Book, then it will be accepted as evidence. (See “information provided must include”) ? add link here to that FAQ 

 Not all these vaccinations will have the batch number included but if there is sufficient other information this record may be able to be used as evidence.

 

? add picture of a blue book to demonstrate

 

The Australian Childhood Immunisation Register (ACIR) has a record of vaccinations given at < 7 years of age.  It was established in 1996. If you are 14 years of age or over, you can contact the Immunisation Register on 1800 653 809 to see if a record is available.

Website: http://www.medicareaustralia.gov.au/public/services/acir/index.jsp

Students were given a ‘Record of Vaccination’ card when vaccinated at school. Copies may be able to be obtained from the Population Health Unit covering the location where you went to school.

 For Hunter New England check the web site: http://www.hnehealth.nsw.gov.au/hneph/immunisation and click the link “Request for Student Vaccination Record Form”. Complete the form and fax to the Population Health Unit.

 A charge of $33.00 (incl. GST) (as at 2013) applies for the supply of duplicate school vaccination records. Once payment is received your request will be processed within 14 days.

Phone: (02) 4924 6477  Fax: (02) 4924 6490

Email: phenquiries@hnehealth.nsw.gov.au

 For other areas, check the local Population Health Unit.

Evidence of vaccination

 For each disease requiring evidence of vaccination provide at least ONE of the following:

  1. Documentation on an Adult Vaccination Card (AVC) or immunisation card equivalent
  2. Included in a statement from a GP Practice on the practice letterhead
  3. School based record of vaccination card or statement from Population Health Unit / Community Health Centre on letterhead
  4. Included on a print out from a Staff Health Database which has been dated, signed and stamped by issuing Staff Health Nurse
  5. The Australian Childhood Immunisation Register (ACIR) for vaccinations given at < 7 years of age
  6. Overseas / interstate vaccination documents

Information provided MUST include:

  1. Date
  2. Batch number
  3. Vaccine brand name
  4. Signature of immunisation provider
  5. Practice/provider stamp

Or a combination of 3 of these details

Incomplete documentation will not be accepted.

Records of vaccinations and serology results that were received overseas must be in English (translations must be certified) and contain enough information about the vaccine (e.g. brand, active components, batch numbers, if available) and vaccination date to enable an assessor to determine if they fulfil the requirements of the Policy Directive.

 

 

As ClinConnect requirements include the need for all student documents to be retained and accessible to those involved with student clinical placement we will need to obtain a copy of all your relevant documents (regardless if you are an existing or previous employee). Your Staff Health Service may be able to assist you with achieving compliance and providing documentation regarding your immunisation status.

No. In most cases you will still be able to undertake placement. It is important to have a knowledge of criminal history in order to manage risks.

Provide documents for either Part A or Part B 

Criminal Record Check
A National Police Certificate with no convictions / charges (issued by Australian State / Territory Police) expires 3 years from issue date
Overseas students only

Along with the Australian National Police Certificate, an original of one of the following has also been sighted and a copy is provided for the records:

Police Certificate with no convictions / charges from their home country or any country that they have resided in
OR
Signed Statutory Declaration with no convictions / charges
OR
B Clinical Placement Authority card issued by NSW Health pre 1 June 2010 (no expiry date) but which is valid for the duration of the course
OR
Clinical Placement Authority card issued by NSW Health post 1 June 2010 (with expiry date)
OR
Conditional letter issued by NSW Health (with expiry date)

No one undertaking work, paid or unpaid, is able to do so until they have provided evidence of immunisation against the list of specified dieseases.

You are required to provide evidence of immunisation against the following infectious diseases:

  • Diphtheria
  • Measles
  • Hepatitis B
  • Pertussis (whooping cough)
  • Mumps
  • Varicella (chickenpox and shingles)
  • Tetanus
  • Rubella
  • Tuberculosis